November 26th, 2012
jsucus
I am not alone in my appreciation of the liberal arts. Those of privilege have appreciated liberal education historically. It has contributed to their access and hold on power and influence. Their sons and daughters, generation after generation, have attended liberal arts institutions without hesitation. There is no job training in their educational landscape. It would be tragic if all the new and previously underserved populations now having access to higher education missed the opportunity for their turn at leadership and influence simply because of the outspoken — arguably purposeful — dismissal of the liberal arts as “useless,” often by those who received a liberal arts education themselves and intend nothing less for their own children.
Reblogged from Infoneer Pulse
November 26th, 2012
jsucus

Using Google Drive to Share A Document

November 25th, 2011
jsucus
Reblogged from Infoneer Pulse
November 10th, 2011
jsucus

Professor Henry Brady discusses political polarization at the 5th Holden Lecture.

April 28th, 2011
jsucus
..[R]eading about the Fisk-Vanderbilt program reminded me that a critical part of any bridge program is socialization into the community through relationship building. While an individual can’t be successful without a particular skill set, similarly an individual can’t be successful without feeling a part of, and understanding how to navigate, the community of science.
April 27th, 2011
jsucus

How Am I Doing - Teacher Evaluation beyond Bubble-In Surveys: Student Engagement

We’re not making an argument against the standard surveys of students assessing teaching performance.  However, the Center has always advocated that faculty desirous of becoming better teachers needed more feedback, earlier and in different forms.  This is the first post in short series highlighting ways for faculty to know how they’re doing as teachers.

1. On a large-ish lecture course I get lots of questions during lecture.  It is actually quite hard to get students to pipe up during a big lecture class. [..] I usually will stop after discussing a difficult concept and ask if there are any questions. They key here is to wait a full minute before proceeding since it is rare that students can both digest what you just said and come up with a question. [..] After a few lectures, if you are lucky, hands simply start popping up at all times without the “awkward minute o’ silence”. Then you know you’ve got ‘em.
2. Lots of people show up to office hours with elaborate questions and what-ifs about the material.  I take showing up to office hours as a sign of being interested enough to make sure you really understand the material. [..] I find that the average office hour visitor is part of the hard-core clique of students that are just curious.
3. Students send unsolicited emails with scientific papers they found and wanted to get my take on them. Or with general more philosophical questions.  Sure, a lot of “studies” the students ask me about are either based on popular press articles or related to some new alternative woo (eg. “Prof, this paper says they found the medical basis of Reiki!”). But you can use this to teach the students how find the primary source material on their own, and to teach them about differentiating science from pseudoscience.
4. After the term is over students send you emails thanking you for the course.
»via Anonymous/Taking It to the Bridge

Of course, items 3-4 are almost as much a barometer of student interest in the course itself as in teaching performance.  We’d expect to see more of this behavior in upper-level courses.  However, the key is really engagement.  At Jackson State, SIRS data over time indicate a strong correlation between high scores in engagement variables and overall rating of the course.  While 3-4 may be too much to ask for in your core course, look for other signs that students are engaging with the content and skills that the course emphasizes.

April 27th, 2011
jsucus

Doing More with More: Teaching Sociology Resources.  This screencast explains step-by-step how to register for the Teaching Sociology Group/Listserv.  The group includes teaching resources including sample assignments, projects and syllabi as well as a community of sociology instructors and professors who can answer your questions.

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The Center promotes the thoughtful integration of teaching, learning and scholarship at Jackson State University. It encourages faculty research productivity with its research and travel grants and facilitates discussions of faculty development.

 

JSU Center for University Scholars

 

Please direct comments, suggestions and corrections to jsucus@jsums.edu.

 

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